Summer’s Object Proposal

/Summer’s Object Proposal

Summer’s Object Proposal

Sogdian Objects

Textile Fragment with Pearl Roundels with a Flower

This silk textile Fragment was found during the excavations at Mount Mug in 1935.It will feature in my thematic essay about the movement of silk on the silk road and will highlight the trade of Sogdian made patterned silks for Chinese silks as well as be an opportunity to talk about Sogdian silk manufacture and the pearl roundel as a central Asian decorative motif.

Sims-Williams, Nicholas “The Sogdian Merchants in China and India,” in Cina e Iran da Alessandro Magno alla dinastia Tang, ed. A. Cadonna & L. Lanciotti. Florence: Leo S. Olschki Editore, 1996.

Bijl, Arnoud, and Birgit Boelens. Expedition Silk Road: journey to the West : treasures from the Hermitage. Amsterdam: Museumshop Hermitage Amsterdam,2014.

Fragment of Patterned Fabric

This band of canvas-weave silk also was discovered at Mount Mug during the 1935 excavations. It is identified in the Hermitage catalog as central Asian in origin. While it may not necessarily be Sogdian made it was part of the large number of textile fragments at Mount Mug, which include both local made silks (like the textile fragment with pearl roundels with a flower) and imported silks. I will use it in my thematic essay about Sogdians and silk on the “silk road”.

Bijl, Arnoud, and Birgit Boelens. Expedition Silk Road: journey to the West : treasures from the Hermitage. Amsterdam: Museumshop Hermitage Amsterdam,2014.

Untitled (Blue and gold textile in “cap” shape with pearl roundels)

This textile object appears to be a cap of some sort. It most closely resembles a male headdress designed in the shape of a helmet covered in Sogdian silk in the hermitage collection (K3-4576) from a 8th-9th century burial mound of the Adygo-Alanian tribes of the Caucasus mountains. If it is in fact a cap of some sort and of Sogdian origin it will feature in my Sogdian hat thematic essay about what the Sogdian hat looked like/meant and would illustrate the relationship between dress styles of the Sogdians to that their surrounding central asian neighbors.

The State Hermitage Museum. “Male Headdress Designed like a Helmet and Covered with Sogdian Silk.” https://www.hermitagemuseum.org/wps/portal/hermitage/digital-collection/25.+Archaeological+Artifacts/339961/?lng=en

 

Hall of Amazons

 I would like to cover the golden goose fable portion of the Hall of amazons wall murals. In the panel the story moves from right to left with a prosperous merchant on the right and the foolish merchant on the left. When the merchant is prosperous he is depicted wearing a Phrygian cap and when foolish he is bear headed. This analysis would feature in my Sogdian hat thematic essay as the mural depiction equates Phrygian caps with merchants and wealth.

 Marshak, Boris. Legends, Tales and Fables in the Art of Sogdiana. New York: Bibliotheca Persica Press, 2002.

Bijl, Arnoud, and Birgit Boelens. Expedition Silk Road: journey to the West : treasures from the Hermitage. Amsterdam: Museumshop Hermitage Amsterdam,2014.

Non Sogdian Objects

Two Tomb Doors

Tang dynasty (618-906) c. 700

From Tomb M6 of He family cemetery at Yanchi

Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region

Stone

89 cm x 43 cm x 5 cm

Ningxia Provincial Museum, Yinchuan

Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China

Lerner, Monks, Merchants, and Nomads in Northwest China p.250-3

Judith Lerner identifies the two dancers on these tomb doors that once guarded the entrance to tomb M6 of the He family cemetery as central Asian dancers doing the huxuan wu ( the Sogdian swirl/whirl). The facial features and clothing of the figures mark them as central Asian and their posture and use of rugs identifies the dance they are doing as the Sogdian Swirl. These doors item will feature in my thematic essay about the Sogdian Swirl and Sogdians employed as dancers.

Juliano, Annette L., Judith A. Lerner, and Michael Alram. Monks and merchants: Silk Road treasures from Northwest China Gansu and Ningxia 4th-7th century. New York, N.Y.: Harry N. Abrams with the Asia Society, 2001.

 

Dancing Central Asian

Tang dynasty (618-906), seventh century

Bronze figure with possibly gilded bronze base

13.7 cm x 8 cm

Shandan municipal Museum, on loan to the Gansu Provinicial Museum, Lanzhou

Lerner, Monks, Merchants, and Nomads in Northwest China p.254-255

Lerner identifies the figure as doing the Sogdian swirl by his posture and that he is Sogdian from his facial features and dress. The most important dress feature that marks his as Sogdian is his peaked hat with a turned up brim. Lerner identifies this cap as a Phrygian cap and as a variation on the brimless Phrygian caps. I will use this figure in my thematic essay about the Sogdian hat an in my essay about the Sogdian Swirl and Sogdians employed as dancers.

Juliano, Annette L., Judith A. Lerner, and Michael Alram. Monks and merchants: Silk Road treasures from Northwest China Gansu and Ningxia 4th-7th century. New York, N.Y.: Harry N. Abrams with the Asia Society, 2001.

 

By | 2018-01-07T14:25:19-05:00 March 15th, 2016|Object Proposals, Summer|0 Comments

About the Author:

Leave A Comment

css.php